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History of Beer

    • 189 posts
    August 25, 2016 6:37 PM EDT

    Beer has been around for ages and the history surrounding it, is chock full of interesting facts!

    Feel free to add any info related to Beer!

     

    Snipped from BeerHistory.com

    Ancient History

    Historians speculate that prehistoric nomads may have made beer from grain & water before learning to make bread.

    Beer became ingrained in the culture of civilizations with no significant viticulture.

    Noah's provisions included beer on the Ark.

    4300 BC, Babylonian clay tablets detail recipes for beer.

    Beer was a vital part of civilization and the Babylonian, Assyrian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Chinese, and Inca cultures.

    Babylonians produced beer in large quantities with around 20 varieties.

    Beer at this time was so valued that it was sometimes used to pay workers as part of their daily wages.

    Early cultures often drank beer through straws to avoid grain hulls left in the beverage.

    Egyptians brewed beer commercially for use by royalty served in gold goblets, medical purposes, and as a necessity to be included in burial provisions for the journey to the hereafter.

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    This post was edited by Lora - CEO at August 25, 2016 7:16 PM EDT
    • 189 posts
    August 25, 2016 7:14 PM EDT

    Informative article about the ingrediants in Ancient Beer from the Smithsonian.

    Snippet of article

    The ancients were liable to spike their drinks with all sorts of unpredictable stuff—olive oil, bog myrtle, cheese, meadow­sweet, mugwort, carrot, not to mention hallucinogens like hemp and poppy. But Calagione and McGovern based their Egyptian selections on the archaeologist’s work with the tomb of the Pharaoh Scorpion I, where a curious combination of savory, thyme and coriander showed up in the residues of libations interred with the monarch in 3150 B.C. (They decided the za’atar spice medley, which frequently includes all those herbs, plus oregano and several others, was a current-day substitute.) Other guidelines came from the even more ancient Wadi Kubbaniya, an 18,000-year-old site in Upper Egypt where starch-dusted stones, probably used for grinding sorghum or bulrush, were found with the remains of doum-palm fruit and chamomile. It’s difficult to confirm, but “it’s very likely they were making beer there,”



    • 189 posts
    August 26, 2016 1:07 AM EDT

    Beer history article from Blog Nectar of the Gods ... posts about the Finnish culture including stories of Magical Madiens  

    snipped: Enlisting the help of Kalevatar, the magical maiden, they conjure creatures to fetch ingredients to ferment the beer. The first is a snow-white squirrel which is sent into the forests of the mountains to retrieve cones from a fir tree. Sadly, when they “Laid them in the beer for ferment, But it brought no effervescence, And the beer was cold and lifeless.”